How to Choose a Home Safe

  • By Admin .
  • 27 Jan, 2017
Dixie Security Solutions Home and Gun Safes

Storing your valuables at home means you need somewhere secure to keep them, and that means a home safe. In order to best protect your prized possessions, you won’t just want to choose any old safe without spending a bit of time learning about the options available to you.

A good home safe should protect your valuables in case of a fire, water damage or would-be thieves. In case of a fire, your most important documents and possessions should be able to survive in a fire-resistant safe, which is one of the biggest concerns of most safe buyers.

Fire Protection

You may think your home will never catch fire, but there is actually a one in four chance of experiencing a fire in your home severe enough to warrant a call to the fire department.1

You may be surprised to learn that safes rated to protect paper documents can still get up to 350° F inside. If you need to store DVDs or computer disks you won’t want the inside of the safe to exceed 125° F, so you will need to spend a bit more. Most home safes offer 30 minutes of protection, but paying more may be able to increase that time.

Burglary Protection

If you see a safe with a TL rating, such as TL-15, it means that particular safe is designed to withstand an attack of 15 minutes with common tools. You may find that most home safes don’t have a burglary resistance rating, as this feature is more common for commercial use such as in jewelry stores.

There are, however, some built-in measures to protect your valuables against the dregs of society. Safes typically weigh 100 pounds with nothing in them, making them difficult to carry. Many of them also come with bolt-down kits or are concealed in a wall or floor.

Water Protection

If your home becomes flooded, you won’t want that water to seep into your safe. Even if you don’t live in an area prone to flooding, you can’t be too careful just in case a plumbing emergency happens.

Other Factors to Consider When Choosing a Safe

·        Size based on what you want to keep in it

·        Portable or permanently installed

·        Combination or keyed lock

·        Price of safe

Choosing a Safe in Houston

Dixie Security Solutions is here to help you choose the best safe for your home. We can help you understand all your options and also provide safe repairs and maintenance. If you have an old safe you can’t get into, we can open it and recommend what to replace it with. Contact Dixie Security Solutions today for all your commercial and residential safe and lock needs.

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Dixie Security Systems Blog

By Admin . 18 Apr, 2017
When asked to describe a key, most people would probably resort to describing an ornate, vintage key or the variety they’d use on their home’s front door. However, many do not realize there are a wide variety of keys available on the market. Although these keys serve the same general purpose, each is cut using different techniques and are best suited to different locks.

Sunk Keys

Often used in heavy machinery or automotive work, sunk keys are a type of key that utilizes a specific metal shape to insert into a key shaft of exactly the same shape and size. Sunk keys are available as rectangular sunk keys, square sunk keys, parallel sunk keys, gib-head keys, feather keys or woodruff keys.

Each of these types is shaped slightly differently and cannot be interchanged between keyholes. For example, a square-shaped sunk key cannot be forcibly inserted into a tapered keyway.

Saddle Keys

Saddle keys are comprised of two sections that fit perfectly into a keyway. In a flat saddle key, the shaft of the key has a recess that fits a flat, rectangular member. When the shaft with the member is inserted into the keyway, the precise shape of the keyway holds the member in place. In hollow saddle keys, the shaft is completely smooth and cylindrical, while the member is rectangular with one carved-out, curved side to perfectly match the curve of the shaft.

The cylindrical shaft is inserted into the keyway and the member slides into a recessed keyway along the shaft, holding it in place. Saddle keys can fall out of the keyway with enough movement, so it is recommended these keys be used for light-duty work.

Tangent Keys

Tangent keys are typically used in heavy-duty work. These keys tend to be rectangular or wedge-shaped. There are one or two recesses carved into a metal shaft. The tangent members are placed into the recesses at an angle, allowing one edge to lock into the shaft and another to extend out past the shaft.

Once these tangent members are placed, the key is inserted into a keyway that is the exact shape of the key with one or two negative recesses to accommodate the tangent members.

Round Keys

Round keys are fairly common in light-duty work. On the cylindrical metal shaft of the key is a small drilled recess that accommodates a rounded, protruding section. The entire key is placed into the keyway, sized to fit the cylindrical shaft and a pathway for the protruding section. The key is typically turned to lock into place.

Splines

Splines are a slightly more complicated variety of key usually used in gear machinery. While they still include a metal shaft, a section around the outer circumference of the shaft is formed into small teeth. The teeth like structures lock into the keyway and provide torque while turning the key.

Secure Your Home or Business with Dixie Security Solutions

With so many varieties of keys, you can get creative with protecting your most valuable assets. To learn more about locking mechanisms, contact Dixie Security Solutions online or call 713-643-5767.
By Admin . 23 Mar, 2017
By Admin . 23 Mar, 2017
By Admin . 23 Mar, 2017
By Admin . 23 Mar, 2017
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